Overlooking Offenses.

Sensible people control their temper; they earn respect by overlooking wrongs. (Proverbs 19:11 NLT)

 

Sometimes, we think that if we overlook a wrong, then we won't be validated or defended. Remember, Jesus was wronged. Yet, He went it the cross like a lamb led to slaughter, and he opened not His mouth. We are never more like Jesus when we overlook an offense. And, we earn respect when we do.

 

I don't always keep my mouth shut about an offense. I don't think, if we are honest, any of us do. However, I have learned one thing about choosing to “vent” an offense. To make sure the offense is redeemed in that vent. In other words, don't share an offense without the intent of it leading to the redemption of it. In doing so, I am careful who I share, or vent, offenses to. I always know that if share an offense with my father, his response will not be, “I can't believe that person” or “I would be done with that person.” He first acknowledges my hurt and says he's sorry. But, then he quickly helps me see the hurt the offender is speaking from and also makes me look within myself at what may be drawing it out of that person. Then, I am able to release forgiveness, and overlook the offense moving forward. And so, it is redeemed.

 

One of the greatest examples of overlooking an offense is when King David traveled to Bahurim, and Shimei, a member of Saul's family came out to curse him. Shimei threw gravel at David and cursed him and accused him of stealing Saul's throne. David's officer, Abishai, couldn't take it and said, “Let me go over and cut off his head!” But, David responded, “Leave him alone and let him curse, for the Lord has told him to do it. And perhaps the Lord will see that I am being wronged and will bless me because of these curses today.”

 

Later in scripture, Shimei begs for mercy. But, to Abishai, this was no small thing. No small offense. To throw gravel at a king and curse the Lord's anointed was a huge deal. Most of us would have agreed with Abishai's response and wanted Shimei punished. But, David shocks his men seeking justice and says “what do I have in common with you?” In other words, how are we even alike? You seek vengeance, and I seek mercy? Ouch. And, then, he says, “Do I not know I am king over Israel?”

 

Ahhhh. The key to David overlooking an offense. He KNEW who he was. His security was built in knowing who he was. Not in other's opinions of him.

 

Remember who you are when you are offended. You are a child of the King. You are OF God. Let this truth go deep within you, so you can overlook wrongs. And, when you must vent, make sure redemption is the end result.

6 Comments

Filed under Life Experiences, Relationships, Virtue

6 responses to “Overlooking Offenses.

  1. Ralph Martin

    Very Good and Thought Provoking…… Proud of you

  2. Brittany Thoms

    Wow. So good. It always comes back to identity doesn’t it? Thank you for this reminder!

  3. Jami

    I really needed to hear this before I go to talk to my child’s teacher about my child being wronged. Thank you!! Always a blessing!!

  4. Joe Hardwick

    Thanks, Dust…..good reminder for me….!!

  5. Roxanne Owens

    I have always been told that I am to nice of a person because I don’t supposedly stand my ground or get even with a person who is offensive or tries to take advantage of but in the end I have faith that as long as God knows my heart goodness will follow despite who tries to offend us !

  6. Peggy Anderson

    I used to have a pastor who quoted his favorite scripture to us all the time; it has become mine also:
    Psalm 119:165
    Great peace have they which love thy law: and nothing shall offend them.
    When I take offense, I know I have to ask myself, why I’m offended and deal with why I have “a right” to be offended. As you said, Jesus kept his mouth shut. I’m only accountable for me and my responses.

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